A Crafter's Life

The Ball of Yarn (which eventually became a hat)

Did you ever need or want to finish a craft project but the project itself had a great emotional weight?

Such is the case with a ball of variegated turquoise yarn in my yarn stash.

Last year near this time I was on a trip with friends to Santa Fe, New Mexico (see posts Santa Fe in Black and White and Creative Inspiration: Georgia O’Keeffe Museum). Sante Fe has many wonderful shops and we did a little winter hat shopping in the shops for my friend Michele who was looking for the perfect turquoise hat to compliment her turquoise winter coat.

After trying on several hats in several shops that did not work, I offered to knit her a hat using turquoise yarn.

When I returned to my home in Central Oregon, my late husband Terry and I went shopping for the perfect yarn and we found it – variegated turquoise yarn.

Terry was taking a break from making quilts and was just enjoying being my “crafting assistant” so he rolled the skein of yarn into a ball to make my hat knitting easier.

This was one of the last crafting things he worked on before he unexpectedly and suddenly died on 12/13/18.

So I had this ball of yarn, that he had wound into a ball.

I could barely touch it much less even think of knitting that hat.

However, as I’ve discovered during my first year journey of widowhood: crafting and making things are good for your spirit. Sometimes it seems like doing something with my hands is healing to my heart.

I began working on the hat in late Winter 2019 as I prepared for my move to Colorado (see series of posts Colorado Bound) to begin a new life adventure.

But it was difficult to work on and I put it away. Every time I picked up the ball of yarn I could picture Terry sitting on the sofa across from me rolling the ball of yarn, watching a TV show with me, and laughing. Some days I still cannot believe my beautiful life with him suddenly ended.

In early October on an unexpectedly snowy day in Denver, I realized that “Winter is Coming” and if my friend Michele was to have that turquoise hat for this winter, I needed to work on it.

And so I did.

Here is my favorite part of knitting a hat – when you switch to the double pointed needles:

2019-11-03_21-39-07_035

Here is the completed hat:

2019-11-06_11-35-43_749

And here is my lovely friend Michele in her new hat (which I gave her this weekend):

2019-11-08_17-43-46_835

I feel very peaceful after completing the hat. Terry was also a friend of Michele’s and he would be very pleased to see the hat completed. His work rolling the ball of yarn was not wasted!


Postscript

To close out this post, here is another inspirational sign from the collection of signs sprinkled about the restaurant I mentioned in yesterday’s post’s Postscript section:

2019-11-08_13-36-33_294

 

21 thoughts on “The Ball of Yarn (which eventually became a hat)”

  1. This hat was done with so very, very much love from every possible angle that it truly does put vibrations in the room, and in this case the wearer, me. I am tearing up as I type this. That last quote is perfect and I will always cherish this hat. I am a very lucky recipient of such a gift. Love to you, my friend. What a journey you are on.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. This is nice. I am happy for what this hat symbolizes. Different angle, I cannot believe that for you the best part is the double pointed needle part. I HATE that part. I like the earlier part of knitting a hat. Maybe we can form a tag team for hat knitting, doing the part we like!!!???

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I’ve knitted for over 50 years and double pointed needles have aggravated me the whole time (along with stranded knitting which I tend to pull too tight, no matter what). Now, intarsia, I love it. Go figure.

        Like

  3. The backstory on your ball of yarn – from purchase, rolling, remembering, through to its creation as a hat-gift – is as rich as its turquoise strands.
    Especially since the receiver is an integral part of the whole…
    Healing – bittersweet for sure.
    hugs

    Like

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