Special Events, WCQN

Visioning Human Rights in the New Millennium, Part III

Yesterday’s post with quilts from the Women of Color Quilting Network and Friends Show Visioning Human Rights in the New Millennium: Quilting the World’s Conscience (Curated By Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi) were just to whet your appetite.

This post features more powerful quilts from the show. If you are just joining us you can click on this link – WCQN – to view the two previous posts (Part I and Part II).

As I mentioned in the previous post, some of these quilts made me want to just step away from my sewing machine and find a new hobby.

I’ve seen many beautiful art quilts over the years – at shows and online – but I’ve never seen in person such a collection of powerful inspirational quilt all in one venue.


Sandra Scott – Bloodties

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The photos do not do this quilt justice. This is definitely one of the quilts in the show that made me want to just give away my sew machine because now I see how art quilts “are done”. It is an absolute masterpiece and reading the Artist Statement and viewing this quilt in person can bring you to tears.


Speaking of quilts that can bring you to tears, this one had me quietly sobbing…

Dorothy Burge – Stop Killing Us

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And now the piece that attempted to completely blow out my tear ducts – a piece inspired by news story of a young Syrian refugee child discovered washed up on the shore.

April Shipp – The Waters Returned Him: In Honor of Aylan Kurdi, Age 3

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This quilt was a 3D quilt with a large set of hands coming forward holding a handmade doll representing the drowned Syrian refugee child. If seeing this quilt in person did not stir someone, then they were emotionally dead inside.

I got to chat with the amazing artist who passionately shared the story behind her inspiration. While listening to her I was desperately trying to keep it together (the tear ducts were starting to crumple) as she shared her beautiful compassion and intense feelings of heartbreak over hearing the news story (okay so I am getting weepy just trying to write this…).

Yes I kept having that “imposter syndrome” feeling being at this show with these significant pieces of work and these amazing artists (some of who are professional artists).

Here are a couple more quilts in the show to close out this post with a little less intense topics.


Carolyn Crump – Deeds, Not Words

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Sharon Ray – Hamtramck, My Home

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I hope you found these pieces as stirring and amazing as I did. In the next post I will share the rest of the sampling of pieces from the show.

18 thoughts on “Visioning Human Rights in the New Millennium, Part III”

  1. Sometimes it is good to have a little bit of the imposter syndrome. It helps keep us humble and pushes us to remember the seriousness and impact of our craft. While art can be fun, art has the power to arrest our attention and offer us a deeper glimpse into who we are as a people.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Martha – yes they do and I was honored to breathe the same air as them during the opening and get to interact with them. They are doing that art I want to go when I “grow up” as an artist 🙂

      Like

  2. Wow… More incredible and powerful pieces! They pack quite a punch even as photos on a screen – it must have been awesome to see them in person. Again, huge congratulations for being part of this exhibition, Tierney! 😀

    Like

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